April 23, 2021

The Daily Roar

Curated News for Traditional Americans

Supreme Court Agrees to Hear Arizona Case that Could Put New Limits on Voting Rights Lawsuits — But Refused Trump Campaign Election Cases


Last Monday the United States Supreme Court refused to review the Pennsylvania 2020 Election cases.

The court made the announcement on Monday morning.

Justices Alito, Gorsuch, and Thomas dissented from the denial.

BREAKING: Supreme Court Refuses to Review Pennsylvania Election Cases – Alito, Gorsuch and Thomas Dissent

TRENDING: BREAKING: THE FRAUD WILL STAND – Supreme Court Rejects Sidney Powell’s Election Fraud Cases without Comment

On Monday, following their inaction last week, the US Supreme Court rejected without comment or explanation, lingering 2020 election challenges by Attorney Sidney Powell in Arizona and Wisconsin.

However, the Supreme Court did agree to hear a case about Arizona restrictions on ballot collection and that penalizes voters who cast ballots in the wrong precinct.

Democrats believe the Arizona law places an unequal burden on racial minorities. It also makes it easier to cheat when you don’t have to show up at your own precinct and can have someone turn in your ballot for you.

It’s not clear why the Supreme Court would take up this case and refuse the other cases brought to the court by the Trump campaign.

FOX News reported:

Eight years after carving the heart out of a landmark voting rights law, the Supreme Court is looking at putting new limits on efforts to combat racial discrimination in voting.

The justices are taking up a case about Arizona restrictions on ballot collection and another policy that penalizes voters who cast ballots in the wrong precinct.

The high court’s consideration comes as Republican officials in the state and around the country have proposed more than 150 measures, following last year’s elections, to restrict voting access that civil rights groups say would disproportionately affect Black and Hispanic voters.

A broad Supreme Court ruling would make it harder to fight those efforts in court. Arguments are set for Tuesday via telephone, because of the coronavirus pandemic.

“It would be taking away one of the big tools, in fact, the main tool we have left now, to protect voters against racial discrimination,” said Myrna Perez, director of the Brennan Center for Justice’s voting rights and elections program…

…The justices will be reviewing an appeals court ruling against a 2016 Arizona law that limits who can return early ballots for another person and against a separate state policy of discarding ballots if a voter goes to the wrong precinct.

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the ballot-collection law and the state policy discriminate against minority voters in violation of the federal Voting Rights Act and that the law also violates the Constitution.





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